Digital Strategies for Attractions in 2018

In 2016 the UK soared past Mexico and Germany to become the 6th most visited tourist destination on the planet. Competition has never been fiercer among thousands of historic sites and visitor centres across the country to tap into the growing market of domestic and international visitors.

While national theme parks have always benefited from economies of scale in marketing from newspapers to cereal boxes, smaller less established venues have often had to be more creative in their outreach initiatives. For such attractions, the rise of digital media has been indispensable as a route to market.

Pictured: available offers could be a prerequisite or the last push that leads consumers to visit an attraction.

Evolving over the years from text to photo to virtual reality, digital media has continued to offer innovative means of engaging with an audience. In a 2014 report into the effect of high-quality listings on consumer perceptions, Google found that on average those sites which offered ‘rich’ media listings generated as much as twice the interest as those without.

As we enter 2018, some of the biggest names in tech are now primed to escort us to a new age of experiential marketing. Samsung, Google, Facebook, Playstation and HTC each have their own virtual reality headsets, with Apple rumoured for a 2018 announcement, and there is no shortage of content with bloggers, advertisers and TV shows keen to explore 360 video as a new medium.

Looking to the future, Mark Zuckerberg is aiming for 1 billion users of Facebook’s Oculus, with the intention to create a full virtual reality for users to experience concerts and galleries from the comfort of their own homes. This is all part of his eventual ambition to create an augmented reality where users can share in simulated experiences.

The Cutter & Cutter gallery in L.A has a virtual tour online, which includes exhibit information.

As a more immediate stepping stone, Google has been building a network of thousands of media producers to accelerate the introduction of their virtual tours, an extension of street view. With notable adopters such as English Heritage and National Trust in 2017, virtual tours are poised to help attractions turn interest into excitement as a highly engaging means of conversion.

Such introductions of new technology have a two-fold impact on the way we consume rich information. On the top-side, early adopters can benefit from a first-mover advantage, gaining widespread recognition over their competitors, new technological shifts are always driven by a small number of facilitators and an expanding audience

 

In addition to technological driven changes, changes in social attitudes have also lead to the emergence of new platforms to promote great experiences. Confidence in online reviews has continued to increase in recent years, with 19% of respondents reporting that they always trust online reviews, and a further 45% having confidence where reviews are corroborated, up from 8% and 40% respectively in 2015.

High numbers of positive visitor reviews indicate a great user experience and demonstrates the venue is reputable and trustworthy.

This increasing reliance and trust is immediately apparent when looking at Trip Advisor’s growth rate. In 2006, Trip Advisor had around 10 million total venue reviews, of which around 34,000 venues were visitor attractions. Ten years and one smartphone boom later, there are now 760,000 visitor attractions listed and 465 million total reviews, with more than 20% year on year growth. This meteoric rise is symptomatic of an increasing reliance on technology to help consumers research and book new experiences.

A similar trend can be seen in the use of voucher codes. Whereas coupons for visitor attractions were once in the form of wrappers and newspaper cut-outs, savvy consumers now scour the web to decide between similar experiences, or reduce the costs of those they would prefer. On average, searches for coupons in the UK have increased 38% year on year for the past 10 years, with search volumes now over 20 times in 2017 what they were in 2007.

What we have and are continuing to see is a veritable explosion in routes to market. Though the mobile boom has passed us, our consumers are still learning and trusting in new methods to plan and research days out. The use of online booking facilities, for example has risen from 10% of museums in 2010, to nearly 30% today.

The sum of these shifts means that Museums and attractions now more than ever must have their finger on the pulse of digital media trends. With each surge in a platforms’ popularity comes a fresh new audience to market to, and the more engaging the content, the more likely this can be translated to footfall from excited new visitors, each keen to share their experiences.

Sources

  1. http://www.e-unwto.org/doi/book/10.18111/9789284419029
  2. https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/11/16459636/mark-zuckerberg-oculus-rift-connect
  3. https://www.statista.com/statistics/315755/online-custmer-review-trust/
  4. https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&geo=GB&q=discount%20code,groupon,wowcher,voucher%20codes,hot%20uk%20deals
  5. https://www.visitbritain.org/sites/default/files/vb-corporate/Documents-Library/documents/England-documents/finalversionofreport2009_tcm30-19612.pdf
  6. https://www.visitbritain.org/sites/default/files/vb-corporate/Documents-Library/documents/England-documents/annual_attractions_trend_report_2016.pdf

 

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